What is a Divertron and What Does it Do?

Divertron Standard and X version. With

Divertron Standard and X version

The Divertron is described as a ‘6 Inch Multistage Sub Booster Pump with Integral Control’. You may be asking yourself ‘what does all that mean?’ – read on to find out.

‘6 Inch’ refers to the diameter of the pump which is an important factor when using it in an application where space is at a premium, i.e. boreholes.

‘Multistage’ refers to the pumping technology used, in this case there are multiple impellers stacked on top of one another. Each impeller creates pressure by rotating at a high speed and using the centrifugal force to direct the water from its centre to its edges. That water is ejected and passed through channels to the centre of the impeller above it where the process begins again, adding further pressure – all things being equal, more stages means more pressure.

‘Sub’ indicates this pump is submersible which means it should be submerged into water when in use. Of course, a submersible pump is fully water proof by design which is an advantage but most of them actually need to be submerged as they use the water to disperse the heat produced while in action.

‘Integral control’ refers to the technology used to turn the pump on and off – in this case it is internal. The Divertron’s integral control system is actually a pressure switch on the output which allows it to turn the pump on when it detects a drop in pressure, caused by opening a tap on the outlet side. This allows you to start the pump by simply turning a tap on – great for irrigation.

There are two types of Divertron pumps and each have two duty options (outlined below):
DIVERTRON 1000 M: Can achieve a maximum head of just over 36 meters and a maximum flow rate of around 1.4 litres per second. It has a screen filter which will ensure no larger objects are sent through the pump.

DIVERTRON X 1000 M: Can achieve a maximum head of just over 36 meters and a maximum flow rate of around 1.4 litres per second. It has a stainless steel ring for use with a suction kit.

DIVERTRON 1200 M: Can achieve a maximum head of over 47 meters and a maximum flow rate of 1.4 litres per second. It has a screen filter which will ensure no larger objects are sent through the pump.

DIVERTRON X 1200 M: Can achieve a maximum head of over 47 meters and a maximum flow rate of 1.4 litres per second. It has a stainless steel ring for use with a suction kit.

We have the complete Divertron range on sale at the moment (July/August 2017) which means you can get your hands on one of these incredibly useful pumps at the lowest price anywhere on the internet.

Atac Staff Explore Depths For Sewer Safety Training

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ATAC Solutions’ staff took a journey to the depths to experience working in a sewer environment. It was part of a Confined Space Training course held at the wastewater specialists’ premises in West Farleigh, near Maidstone. A two-tiered mobile unit, which featured a configurable tunnel labyrinth, was hired to replicate oxygen-deficient, belowground conditions.

Reis Gilham, Sales Executive at ATAC, one of eight staff members to take part in the exercise, said: “The idea of taking part in a confined space training exercise was slightly daunting initially. I really didn’t know what to expect, but found the whole experience totally fascinating.”

It’s estimated at least 15 people are killed in the UK each year whilst working in confined spaces. Many deadly gasses lurk underground which make sewer cleaning and maintenance a particularly hazardous occupation. Exposure to sewage or its products can also result in a number of illnesses including hepatitis, gastroenteritis, diarrhoea and vomiting.
During ATAC’s confined space training exercise, which was run by ESS Salesforce, staff were shown how to wear a gas mask correctly due to the deadly fumes present in sewers. They also learnt to read volumes of noxious activity via a gas monitor.

For their belowground training, teams entered the mobile unit in pairs. The facility consisted of 44 metres of configurable tunnel labyrinth, three access points allowing horizontal and vertical entry and exit, as well as LED and emergency lighting. Staff were required to search for certain lights and via radio, relay gas readings to an ‘outside’ team. As part of the exercise, an alarm sounded to indicate teams had entered a ‘vulnerable situation’, requiring staff to wear gas marks and make an emergency exit.

Reis Gilham, who joined ATAC in 2016, added: “It was only an exercise, but a siren’s sound in an enclosed environment without lights can still unnerve. I’m pleased to say we escaped, and the whole training exercise proved an enjoyable learning experience.”

Formed in 2007, ATAC is one of the leading environmental engineering companies in the UK contracting to both domestic, and blue-chip companies throughout the UK. The company has maintained a zero on-site incident record during its 10-year operation.

Adam Colley, ATAC’s Commercial Director, said: “We have a perfect staff safety record, which initiatives such as confined space training will help uphold. Staff health and safety is our number one priority. We thank all those who took part in the exercise for taking it extremely seriously and acknowledging the dangers present in belowground working, particularly within sewers.”

Going Underground: Confined Space Training For Safe Sewer Working

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Entering sewers or tanks requires more than a hard hat, hi-vis and torch. Personnel must be equipped with sufficient knowledge and experience before descending these deep, dark, damp realms, hence ATAC Solutions provides Confined Space Training: an examining exercise in an oxygen deficient atmosphere. Reis Gilham, a Sales Executive at ATAC, underwent his first day’s training in June. It proved to be an enlightening experience, despite the pitch-black conditions, as he explained.

“Initially, the idea of taking part in a confined space training exercise was slightly daunting as I really didn’t know what to expect. Once we got into the swing of things, however, any trepidation soon vanished and I found the whole experience totally fascinating.

Before taking the plunge into the pitch dark, our group was given a health and safety tutorial on the many life-threatening risks associated with a job, which on the face of it at least, appears fairly simple and straightforward. Our group learnt how different gasses can be harmful in a confined space area; how to identify them and how to read gas volumes via a monitor. We also learnt about precautions needed to be taken when entering a confined space with gasses present. One of the most important aspects was how to wear a gas mask correctly, as fumes released in sewers can kill. This was followed by a short paper test to ensure we’d absorbed the vital information we’d been given, and a practical demonstration on using a gas mask, alarm and harness underground.

Then came the moment of truth: we faced our first confined space test. Okay, so we weren’t descending deep beneath the road’s surface as staff would do in an on-the-job situation, but we were required to enter the dark, dingy, smelly chamber of a mobile confined space training unit – supplied by ESS Salesforce – which replicated a sewer environment some would one day confront for real. The two-tiered mobile unit consists of 44 metres of configurable tunnel labyrinth, three access points allowing horizontal and vertical entry and exit, as well as LED and emergency lighting.

We entered the unit in pairs and were instructed to search for certain lights. Via radio, we relayed our gas readings to our ‘outside’ team and informed them we were okay. Then suddenly an alarm sounded. It was part of a scenario to alert us to the fact we were in a vulnerable situation. It was only an exercise, but a siren’s sound in an enclosed environment without lights can still unnerve. We had acted quickly, put on our gas masks and exit the facility as soon as possible, using only torches as a guide.

I’m pleased to say we escaped, and the whole training exercise proved an enjoyable learning experience. I’m now confined space-trained, which means even from the comfort of my office, I can identify which equipment is needed to protect against risks associated with sewer entry.”